Pain Control Massage Oil

lifeintmed-pain-massage-oil

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PAIN CONTROL Massage Oil - Apply over the pain area several times a day. PAIN CONTROL Massage oil is a combination of 13 anti pain oils (i.e. cloves, Myrrh, Lemon,) and DMSO which work synergistically to penetrate deep into the area of pain.

PLEASE NOTE THAT WE DO NOT SHIP TO JAPAN

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PAIN CONTROL Massage Oil - Apply over the pain area several times a day. PAIN CONTROL Massage oil is a combination of 13 anti pain oils (i.e. cloves, Myrrh, Lemon,) and DMSO which work synergistically to penetrate deep into the area of pain. More effective when used in conjunction with PAIN CONTROL Homeopathic sublingual grains – thallium Metal.

TYLENOL – one of the most dangerous Pain Killers

Acetaminophen, sold under the brand name Tylenol, among others, may be among the most dangerous medicines on the market. 
 
Acetaminophen overdose is actually the leading cause for calls to Poison Control Centers across the US—more than 100,000 instances per year—and, each year, is responsible for:1
 
More than 56,000 emergency room visits
 
2,600 hospitalizations
 
An estimated 458 deaths due to acute liver failure
 
In fact, according to data from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group registry, acetaminophen poisoning is responsible for nearly HALF of ALL acute liver failure cases in the US.2 
 
As stated in a paper published in the journal Hepatology3 an entire decade ago:
 
"[Acetaminophen] is heavily marketed for its safety compared to nonsteroidal analgesics. By enabling self-diagnosis and treatment of minor aches and pains, its benefits are said by the Food and Drug Administration to outweigh its risks. It still must be asked: Is this amount of injury and death really acceptable for an over-the-counter pain reliever?"
 
Acetaminophen—More Dangerous Than You Ever Suspected
 
In the program above, originally aired by ThisAmericanLife.org4 in September of last year, host Ira Glass recounts the story of Sarah Erush.
 
Sarah is a pharmacist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania who was contacted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about a number of cases of acetaminophen overdosing at her hospital. The FDA encouraged her to sit down and collate the data, and when she did, some very interesting, and disturbing, patterns emerged. As Ira Glass reports:
 
"Erush was surprised by how little over the recommended dose of the drug resulted in liver damage and, for three patients, death.
 
One of the country's most popular over-the-counter painkillers — acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol — also kills the most people, according to data from the federal government. Over 150 Americans die each year on average after accidentally taking too much. And it requires a lot less to endanger you than you may know."
 
As it turns out, acetaminophen can be toxic to your liver even at recommended doses when taken daily for just a couple of weeks.5
 
1 Hepatology 2004 Jul;40(1):6-9
2 Hepatology 2004 Jul;40(1):6-9
3 Hepatology 2004 Jul;40(1):6-9
4 ThisAmericanLife.org September 20, 2013
5 JAMA July 5, 2006: 296(1); 87-93